Posts Tagged ‘Twentieth Century’

It’s our choice

“The real problem is in the hearts and minds of men. It is easier to denature plutonium than to denature the evil spirit of man.” Albert Einstein

Larry Echohawk, the assistant secretary for Indian Affairs at the U.S. Department of Interior, recently commented on the mistreatment of the “first Americans” by the United States government. Mr. Echohawk described “very dark chapters” of United States history, including “government atrocities against the Indian people.”

Because of the strong emotions that accompany such statements, exploring these remarks could lead us through a bed of hot coals. But, it’s worth the risk because this topic deserves more discussion.

The best man I ever new – Father’s Day 2009

When the call came that August day, I was working at Safeway, stocking grocery shelves to earn money for college.  My dad was dead; a heart attack.  The family anchor was gone.

Dad was 60, I was 19, and too young to lose my dad.  I was at the age when you know the least, convinced you know the most.  The age when you are pretty sure your dad is outdated, out of touch, and not too bright.  The age when you cannot fathom the possibility you might be wrong.

We ask them to kill – VETERAN’S DAY

We ask our military to do the unspeakable, the unthinkable.  We ask them to kill fellow human beings.  We ask of them what we are unable to ask of ourselves. Moreover, we do not want to see or know what they do.  We are appalled when we see a television image of a marine killing an Iraqi who is “faking dead.”  We condemn that marine.  We must or else we feel we are condoning it.  It doesn’t matter that he did nothing wrong.  We saw it.  We saw him kill that man.  We are not supposed to see that happen.  How dare he make it real. 

“A brother’s a brother”

I recently made each of my three brothers a gift, an irregularly shaped piece of three-quarter inch thick walnut about seven inches square, with a two-inch by six-inch brass plaque.  In front of the plaque sits a metal scale model 1996 John Deere riding lawn mower and four small sticks tied in a bundle.  I worried these were a bit too ‘hokey’ and each one might end up in the back of a closet.  Instead, each brother has theirs sitting out.  Well, at least they’re sitting out when I visit.

The war we don’t celebrate

Shouldn’t we celebrate the anniversary of a war?  Don’t the lost lives deserve recognition?  Most wars do deserve celebration; but not all wars.  Wars that never seem to end, that have ongoing deaths, are difficult to celebrate.  Wars like those in many third world countries seem endless; seem to be a way of life, continuing for decades.  How do you celebrate that type of war?  The Palestinians and Israelis have been at war so long the violence is a daily routine.