Posts Tagged ‘Civil and political rights’

Impenetrable borders

Is border security a priority for the government? The president proposes adding $500 million to the Border Patrol budget, which seems significant until you remember he spent over $3 billion on the “cash for clunkers” program. Further, his solution for the 12 to 20 million illegal aliens already here is to create a way for them to become U.S. citizens. But won’t that just increase future illegal entry into our country rather than eliminate it?

Selective law enforcement

 

    

 

 What do you do with a county sheriff who treats criminals like criminals, who enforces all the laws, not just the politically correct ones? 

Simple. You claim racism, civil rights violations, and contact the Justice Department. His critics hoped it would seek to remove him from office. Instead, Loretta King, acting assistant attorney general in charge of the investigation, said that if the investigation uncovers violations, her office “will provide recommendations on ways to improve practices and procedures.”  

Should gay marriage be legal?

On November 4th three more states passed constitutional amendments refusing to legalize gay marriage, raising the total to thirty states with similar amendments.  Gays were outraged at the outcome and at those who did not support legalizing gay marriage.

Gay rights activists are attacking the Mormon Church because it backed the initiative against gay marriage.  Gays told the church they “will pay a price.”  Gay rights activist John Aravosis said, “Utah is a hate state … and Mormons are persecutors.”  He promises that they will “destroy the Utah brand.”  Someone even terrorized Mormon temples in Los Angeles and Salt Lake City by sending letters containing a white powder.  And, Scott Eckern, artistic director of the California Musical Theater in Sacramento, was forced to resign by gay activists because he donated money to the campaign to not legalize gay marriage. 

Sarah Palin and the feminist movement?

The feminist movement must be rejoicing.  After four decades of advocating equality for women, we are witnessing the real possibility of a female Vice-President of the United States.  The National Organization for Women (NOW) should be congratulated for the doors they opened for women, the doors opened to equality.  Their advocacy for women’s rights started in 1966 with a statement of purpose to “take action to bring women into full participation in the mainstream of American society, exercising all the privileges and responsibilities thereof, in truly equal partnership with men.”  Wasn’t that a reasonable expectation?  Women had been too often second-class citizens in far too many ways.  NOW continued to admire the stay-at-home moms; they just wanted it to be by choice rather than by expectation and convention.  They simply wanted women to have equal opportunities and treatment.  If women chose to work, they asked they be treated equally.  They wanted simple civil rights and simple fairness.

Let’s work together to balance civil rights and national security

The Sikh man felt violated when asked to remove his turban by a court bailiff in Dallas, Texas.  Was that discrimination?  Was he treated any differently than anyone else entering the courthouse?  Should his faith have allowed him rights other individuals do not have?

The airline captain removed six Muslim imams from the flight.  He was told the imams were saying the words “U.S.,” “killing Saddam,” and chanting “Allah, Allah.” He was told they were “acting angry.”  Was his decision ethnically motivated or religiously biased?  Were the imams treated unfairly, singled out because of their nationality or faith?  Would a reasonable person with the same information have made the same choice?